Bullet Points

Bullet Points2018-11-09T07:12:53+00:00

August 2020

July 2020

June 2020

History Lesson

Chamomile is more versatile that you think! Find out how herbalists of the past used it.

This video snippet was taken from our Chamomile class, found in our Top 40 Herbs of North America course. If you are a member, you can view it here.

If you are not a member, you can sign up here.

May 2020

Lots of Nutrients

There are over 200 nutrients that have been found, that are beneficial to man, in Aloe Vera.

This video snippet is taken from our Aloe Vera class, found in our Top 40 Herbs of North America course. If you have a membership, you can view it here.

If you do not have a membership, you can sign up here.

Miners

Alfalfa roots grow deep into the earth to soak up precious nutrients.

This video snippet was taken from our Alfalfa class, found in our Top 40 Herbs of North America course. If you are a member, you can view it here.

If you are not a member, you can sign up here.

April 2020

Catnip Tea

Catnip is a gentle plant, so be gentle when you brew your Catnip tea!

This video snippet was taken from our Catnip class, found in our Top 40 Herbs of North America course. If you are a member, you can view it here.

If you are not a member, you can sign up here.

Strengthen Those Lungs!

Meet Mullein. If you were to go buy some cut up mullein leaves in bulk, you might be surprised at how light and fluffy they are. But stored inside those nice, soft, friendly-looking leaves is a powerhouse of nutrients for your lungs. As far back as Civil War times, when soldiers ran out of conventional medical supplies, they turned to mullein.

Here are some interesting aspects of this velvet leaf:

  • Mullein assists the body in soothing inflamed tissues.
  • Mullein helps strengthen sinuses and supports free breathing.
  • Mullein may assist the body in clearing the lungs and calming spasms.
  • Mullein supports general respiratory health.
  • Mullein supports healthy lymphatic flow.
  • Mullein assists the body in nourishing healthy nerves, especially those agitated by coughs or spasms.
  • Mullein helps the body move mucus out.
  • Mullein assists the body in protecting mucous surfaces and may help inhibit the absorption of allergens through mucous membranes.
  • Oil of Mullein helps the body in dealing with symptoms associated with ear infections.

As the cold months approach, this is a great herb to have on hand. Taking it as a tea is the most soothing method. Drink up, stay warm, and breathe right!

Bone Broth: What is it and why should I eat it??

 

Well, just like the name suggests, it’s a broth, but one that is incredibly nutritious and helpful to the body.  Made from boiling bones of healthy animals along with vegetables and herbs, bone broth is packed with minerals (like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium) in forms that your body can easily absorb.  The nutrition within can help the body improve joint and ligament health, digestive health, as well as assist the body in fighting inflammation and cellulite. You’ll notice that when it cools it usually gels.  That’s because of the pure gelatin that is leached out of the collagen from the animal bones. This helps support the body with healthy hair, skin, and nails and who doesn’t love that?

 

Now that you’re mouth is watering, here’s the recipe:

 

Ingredients

  • Several Pounds of Grass-fed Beef Bones (Suggested is 5-8 lbs)
  • A freezer bag full of vegetable scraps (carrot peelings, onion tops, celery leaves etc.)
  • Fresh, filtered water
  • 2 Tbsp Cider Vinegar
  • 2-3 Bay Leafs

Instructions

  1. Rinse and clean the bones under clean water. Pat them dry.
  2. Roast the bones at 400 ° F for about an hour until the bones are well-browned and fragrant.  Roasting the bones ensures a good flavor in the resulting beef stock. Failure to do so may lend a sour or off-taste to the end product.
  3. Once the bones are browned, drain off any fat.  
  4. Add the bones to a big pot along with any vegetable scraps you might have. **Important tip:   Avoid using brassicas (cabbage, broccoli, turnips, Brussels sprouts etc.) as these vegetables will lend a bitter flavor to your stock. Instead: garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, carrots and celery add great flavor.**
  5. Add filtered water to cover and bring to a boil. Once you’ve brought the water to a boil,  add the vinegar and bay leafs.
  6. Turn down the heat and continue to simmer for several hours. it is recommended to let it simmer for about 24 hours.
  7. Throughout the cooking process, skim off any foam and add water as needed.
  8. When the stock is finished simmering, filter through a fine mesh sieve and bottle in mason jars. The stock should set just like gelatin, and the fat should rise to the top.
  9. Pick off the fat and reserve it for cooking, then scoop out the gelled stock and reheat to  serve as soup. Note that it’s wise to serve this stock very hot as it gels again once it cools.

Try it for a week and see what you think!